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Category: Religious Education

Worship Idea – Prayer Baubles

I’m in the midst of running numerous Messy Christingle afternoons for our local school.  I was thinking of ideas to engage slightly older children (Years 5 and 6) so went to my happy place – The Range (UK shop).  I came across these empty baubles (£1.99 for 6) which gave rise to this…

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I cut a few sheets of red and green paper into strips.  I asked the children what they were most looking forward to for Christmas.  All sorts of different answers came but the first was “spending time with my family” and the second was “giving presents”.  OK, I admit that these were total gifts as answers but we also talked about sprouts along the way as well.

On one side of the paper we wrote a prayer for our family or friends.  I showed them mine – “Lord I pray for my mum” and explained that she wasn’t very well and that was why I wanted to pray for her.

On the other side we were “inspired by your answer that you look forward to giving” and wrote a prayer for people who are in need at Christmas.

Then we rolled them up and put them inside the bauble.

Then we added two pinches of glitter (that bag of shiny cuttings that cost a measly £1 from The Range).

Add a piece of thread and voilà!

Advent 10 - Holy

Prayer baubles that we can shake during the worship as a prayer.  Then you can take it home and hang it on your tree!

 

 

The Bible and the English Language

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=kN7-EvgKAsk]

The Open University have produced some great potted history videos with famous people doing a quick run down of a topic.  My favourite is David Mitchell’s look at Schrödinger’s Cat.  This one is probably more use to the readers of this blog though…

Social Media vs The Church(TM)

Bosco Peters has reproduced an article from a local newspaper that has some very interesting quotations from The Digital Nun, Sister Catherine Wybourne.  I’ve written previously about the autonomy of social networks and made the comparison between the digital revolution and the printing press so I won’t produce the article in full here.  However, there is one really interesting point that Sr Catherine makes:

“Being web-savvy should be a required skill for religious leaders in general”

This harks back to a conversation I had with a colleague about what professional expectations are made of those in positions of church leadership.  When I was an RE teacher there were expectations of my capability that extended beyond my ability as a theologian.  The government insisted that I must be able to pass a literacy test, a numeracy test and a computing (ICT) test before I would be allowed to enter the classroom.  The government decided that without those skills they consider essential or required, I would not be able to effectively discharge my duties as a classroom teacher.  People who trained in a previous era were given ongoing training to facilitate their careers and allow their cumulative years of wisdom to continue to guide and instruct the youth of this country.

So what are we doing about this level of aptitude as The Church(TM)?  Many of our church leaders move into positions of managerial responsibility but at what point do we train them for that task?  If we are fostering an online as well as offline presence in our communities, at which point are our leaders being equipped for that?  Before they are selected?  During training?  Continuing Ministerial Education?  I think I know the answer.

I need to ponder this one.  What do you guys think?

To God

You have got to love the humble man who heads the Anglican Church.  A six year old girl asked “To God, How did you get invented?” in an RE lesson at primary school and her very witty atheist father emailed it to lots of church authorities.  Rowan wrote back.

Dear Lulu,

Your dad has sent on your letter and asked if I have any answers. It’s a difficult one! But I think God might reply a bit like this –

‘Dear Lulu – Nobody invented me – but lots of people discovered me and were quite surprised. They discovered me when they looked round at the world and thought it was really beautiful or really mysterious and wondered where it came from. They discovered me when they were very very quiet on their own and felt a sort of peace and love they hadn’t expected.

Then they invented ideas about me – some of them sensible and some of them not very sensible. From time to time I sent them some hints – specially in the life of Jesus – to help them get closer to what I’m really like.

But there was nothing and nobody around before me to invent me. Rather like somebody who writes a story in a book, I started making up the story of the world and eventually invented human beings like you who could ask me awkward questions!’

And then he’d send you lots of love and sign off.

I know he doesn’t usually write letters, so I have to do the best I can on his behalf. Lots of love from me too.

+Archbishop Rowan

What a guy.  Encore!!